Photo Information

Gunnery Sgt. Jason Mowry, the military police chief and St. Charles, Mo., native with Combat Logistics Battalion 22, 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit, speaks to Marines from the MEU during non-combatant evacuations operations training aboard USS Bataan, April 22, 2011. The training focused on the entry control center where Marines would search all evacuees. The Marines and sailors of the 22nd MEU are currently deployed with Amphibious Squadron 6 aboard the USS Bataan Amphibious Ready Group and will continue to train and improve the MEU’s ability to operate as a cohesive and effective Marine Air Ground Task Force. The 22nd MEU is a multi-mission, capable force, with approximately 2,200 Marines and sailors, and comprised of Aviation Combat Element, Marine Medium Tilt Rotor Squadron 263 (Reinforced); Logistics Combat Element, Combat Logistics Battalion 22; Ground Combat Element, Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment; and its Command Element.

Photo by Cpl. Dwight A. Henderson

MEU Continues Preparations for any Future Operations

22 Apr 2011 | Cpl. Dwight A. Henderson

Marines from 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit conducted non-combatant evacuation operations training aboard USS Bataan April 22, 2011.

The training focused on the entry control center where Marines would search all evacuated personnel.

Military policemen from Combat Logistics Battalion 22, 22nd MEU, instructed Marines and sailors with Headquarters and Service Company, Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 22nd MEU.  The trainers used different evacuee search techniques using metal detectors, pat downs, detailed searching and searching an individual in flex-cuffs.

“We’re doing this so [the Marine or sailor] knows what to do and what not to do when searching people,” said Lance Cpl. Chad A. Hamilton, a military policeman and Petrolia, Texas, native, with CLB-22.

One of the biggest challenges the Marines may face is searching people thoroughly with time restraints, and the Marines always ensure safety over speed.

“I’m not as concerned with how many people I’m processing,” said Hamilton. “I’m more concerned with the safety of those around me.”

After practicing the different search techniques, the Marines reviewed detainee procedures.  They covered the in-depth paperwork and preached the philosophy of treating every detainee as a U.S. citizen.

“If you do that, you can’t go wrong,” said Lance Cpl. Robert J. Pinkowski, a military policeman and Syracuse, N.Y., native, with CLB-22.

During the deployment, the MEU may conduct missions requiring these skills and it is important for the Marines to be trained appropriately.

“This training is always useful, especially not knowing where we’re going and what we’re going to do,” said Lance Cpl. Joshua P. Majoros, an administrative clerk and Cleveland native, with the BLT. “Every bit of training helps.”

The Marines and sailors of the 22nd MEU are currently deployed with Amphibious Squadron 6 aboard the USS Bataan Amphibious Ready Group and will continue to train and improve the MEU’s ability to operate as a cohesive and effective Marine Air Ground Task Force.

The 22nd MEU is a multi-mission, capable force, commanded by Col. Eric J. Steidl and comprised of an Aviation Combat Element, Marine Tilt Rotor Squadron 263 (Reinforced); a Logistics Combat Element, CLB-22; a Ground Combat Element, Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Bn., 2nd Marines; and its Command Element.

Marine Expeditionary Units are the Marine Corps' smallest permanent Marine Air-Ground Task Force, and comprised of approximately 2,200 Marines and sailors ready to provide immediate response to a hostile environment or crisis.


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22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit